NIETZSCHE: The Dignity of Work

“Such phantoms as the dignity of man and the dignity of work are the feeble products of a slavery that hides from itself.” 19th century German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, wrote these words in a short preface titled, The Greek State. In the preface, Nietzsche denounces the belief that work is honorable. On the contrary, he argues that work is a shameful necessity of culture. In this video, we will explain Nietzsche’s argument and we will also discuss whether his argument holds true today. Continue reading

William James: The Moral Equivalent of War

In his essay titled, The Moral Equivalent of War, 19th century American philosopher William James writes, “History is a bath of blood. Our ancestors have bred pugnacity into our bone and marrow, and thousands of years of peace won’t breed it out of us.” Although war is horrific, it is also beneficial. Wars promote political unity by uniting people against a common enemy, and wars promote the cultivation of virtue by inspiring people to perform noble and heroic deeds of self-sacrifice. In this video, we will discuss William James’ examination of the relationship between mankind and war. Continue reading

Webster: The White Devil

John Webster was an early 17th century English playwright. He is best known for his dark, gloomy, and morbid tragedies. Literary critic, T.S. Eliot, wrote that “Webster was much possessed by death and saw the skull beneath the skin.” In this video, we will discuss Webster’s treatment of death in his famous tragedy titled, The White Devil. Continue reading

CAMUS: The Absurd Hero

“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide.” Thus, 21st century French philosopher Albert Camus begins his celebrated essay titled, The Myth of Sisyphus. In this video, we will discuss Camus’ thoughts on the Absurd condition of human life and the three responses to that condition – physical suicide, philosophical suicide, and acceptance. Continue reading

Thoughts on the “Undiscovered Country”

Thoughts on the “Undiscovered Country”

The body’s decomposition is an evident truth, accepted by scientists and theologians alike, “dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.” But if man is not merely composed of a physical body, but also a soul, then what is the fate of this spiritual essence after death? Some of humanity’ greatest thinkers have pondered over this question, and formed remarkably diverse answers. Religious zealotry, atheism, and utter indifference are just a few responses.

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