PLATO: The Republic [Book III]

In Book III of Plato’s Republic, Socrates continues his discussion of poetry. He asserts that poetry ought to dispel the fear of death, not encourage it. For example, he criticizes Homer’s portrayal of Achilles in the underworld. In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus meets Achilles in the underworld. Achilles tells Odysseus that he “would rather be a serf on the land of a poor man than rule over all the dead.” Socrates argues that this type of attitude will cultivate a fear of death in the minds of young men who read Homer’s Odyssey. This development of cowardice is contrary to Socrates’ goal of training men to “choose death in battle rather than defeat and slavery.” Continue reading

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CAMUS: The Absurd Hero

“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide.” Thus, 21st century French philosopher Albert Camus begins his celebrated essay titled, The Myth of Sisyphus. In this video, we will discuss Camus’ thoughts on the Absurd condition of human life and the three responses to that condition – physical suicide, philosophical suicide, and acceptance. Continue reading